Tag Archives: Rock N’ Roll

KISS – KISS (Review)

Can you guess which of these guys got someone else to do their makeup?

KISS, the band’s self-titled debut album from 1974, is loaded with more classics than any other studio album they would ever put out. The masked New York rockers were already making a reputation as an explosive live act and when you look at the tracks featured here, Strutter, Firehouse, Cold Gin, Deuce, Black Diamond and 100,000 Years, it’s no wonder few bands dared take them out as support act.

But it’s not all cut from that timeless cloth. The gimmicky single Kissin’ Time and the aimless instrumental Love Theme From KISS detract from the album. And the band were unable to capture the power and excitement of their live shows in the studio. KISS at their best put a spring in your step like no other band but the production and performance here is too tentative to quite achieve that.

KISS would eventually deliver definitive renditions of these songs on their mega-selling 1975 album Alive! But there’s a reason so many of that live album’s songs were drawn from their debut. KISS is a must-hear for fans of street-level, meat and potatoes hard rock. A flawed classic that planted the seeds of success with its pop-savvy mix of Humble Pie boogie, tasty heavy riffs and an array of songs that would become the stuff of legend.

HMO Rating: 4 Out Of 5

[KISS – Deuce]

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Song of the Week: Chuck Berry – Roll Over Beethoven (Live)

Chuck Berry (1926 – 2017)

There couldn’t be any other choice today. Chuck Berry was one of the original rock n’ rollers and an essential innovator in the story of rock. A phenomenally talented writer, performer and guitarist.

But which song to pick? I was thinking Reelin’ and Rockin’ or Guitar Boogie from the One Dozen Berrys album but then I remembered this amazing footage from the Heppest of the Hep Facebook page and decided to go with this. It’s an awesome performance of one of his most legendary tunes: Chuck lets rip with plenty of guitar licks and works through all his iconic stage moves too. The audience are justifiably appreciative at the end. And we should be too… a big round of applause, please, for Chuck Berry.