Tag Archives: Boaby

Magnum – Wings of Heaven

Magnum - Wings of Heaven (1988)
Magnum – Wings of Heaven (1988)

Chase the Dragon and On a Storyteller’s Night are the sturdier, rockier picks of the Magnum back catalogue but they reached their peak of life-affirming, pop rock joy with Wings of Heaven: one of the most feelgood albums ever created. Tony Clarkin writing simple, catchy AOR rockers par excellence delivered with winning passion and panache by the ever-lovable Bob Cately. Boaby sings like he would take bullets for Magnum. “It’s a flame that keeps burning… everLASTing torrrchhhh!”, “Too old to die young, too big to cry… MAMA!” The guy’s a total hero. As soon as he chimes in on genius opener Days of No Trust (“Pray to the future…”) you are on your feet. The album continues with the vista of Wild Swan and the sublime power pop of Start Talking Love. Classics all. Different Worlds is a mid-album lull but Pray for the Day and the WWI epic Don’t Wake the Lion (Too Old to Die Young) end the album with weight and compassion: breathtaking, heartrending but still triumphant, mighty and melodic. It’s a colossal climax to an excellent album. File this in your collection alongside your Jovi, Lep and Whitesnake and it won’t be long before it steals your heart. A heavenly magnum opus.

[Magnum – Days of No Trust]

Advertisements

Alice Cooper – Killer

Big Killer and Baby Killer (Rhino LP and CD from the Studio Albums box set)
Big Killer and Baby Killer (Rhino LP and CD from the Studio Albums box set)

Trying to catch up with some old favourites so I gave this a spin tonight. One of my all-time favourites and an album that always hits the spot. The original Alice Cooper band released a bunch of brilliant albums but this is the cream of the crop. If I wanted to show someone how incredible and unique this band was, this would be Exhibit A. No slight on the albums that followed but on School’s Out and Billion Dollar Babies you start to get into the whole Boaby Ezrin theatrical production numbers whereas, even at its most far-out, Killer is straight-up garage rock n’ roll all the way. And it’s just awesome: cars, telephones, come-ons, spies, teenagers, a cowboy that’s really Jim Morrison, bad parenting, murder and a watch that turns into a lifeboat. Killer, right enough.

[Alice Cooper – You Drive Me Nervous]

Buying Round-Up – May to July 2014

It’s time for a catch-up on my recent acquisitions. Attentive readers may have noticed there haven’t been any buying posts for the May to July period. I’ve been focusing on writing full reviews of my purchases instead but, given that I’m not the most prolific reviewer, I’ll continue doing these round-ups to cover the purchases I have gotten round to covering in detail.

Vallenfyre – Splinters (£12 Fopp Glasgow)

Vallenfyre’s 2011 debut album A Fragile King was one of the best debuts of recent years. With their superb, filthy second album this side-project (helmed my Paradise Lost’s Greg Mackintosh) is starting to sound like a legitimate supergroup and a real threat. An album of the year contender. Even if I’m still a bit disappointed that they didn’t call the album Skelfs.

Led Zeppelin – I, II and III (2CD Editions) (£14ea HMV Glasgow)

Having tired of Led Zeppelin’s music over the years, I wasn’t sure how appealing these reissues were to me. After much umming and ahhing… I bought them anyway. Ultimately I wasn’t happy with my current CD copies and these have proved to be satisfying upgrades. They look and sound fantastic. They’ve even managed to renew my enjoyment of the music a little but not enough for me have bothered with the alternative mixes etc… on the bonus discs yet. I got right into the Paris Olympia show that comes with the debut though and I wish they had included more live tracks with the other CDs. I’m looking forward to the next batch of Zep reissues, which will be bought with less hesitation.

Anathema – Distant Satellites (CD/DVD Edition) (£13 Love Music Glasgow)

Anathema have been a favourite band of mine for many years but this new release has been a little disappointing. I’ve still enjoyed it and it may still grow on me but it seems to me like the band has maybe exhausted their current direction. The album gets refreshingly experimental in its second half and I hope the band continue this tinkering with their next album. I suspect this will prove to be a transitional album in their career.

Accept – Balls to the Wall and Metal Heart (2CD Editions) (£8ea Amazon Marketplace)

Having finally clicked with Restless and Wild I decided to work through Accept’s other albums. I can’t believe it’s taken me this long to discover the joys of Balls to the Wall. It’s like not having Heaven in Hell in your collection or something like that. A complete oversight! It’s captured my imagination so thoroughly I’ve not spent much time with the follow-up Metal Heart, although my initial listens have been equally promising. These superb value reissues come with a live album (Staying a Life) and a live EP (Kaizoku-Ban) as bonuses but I’m going to leave those until I’m more familiar with the studio output.

Ian Hunter – The Artful Dodger (£10 Amazon Marketplace)

I’m delighted to finally get this out-of-print Ian Hunter album. It’s pretty strong too, apart from one song Skeletons (In Your Closet) which I disliked, and it contains the original version of Michael Picasso which is one of my all-time favourites of Ian’s and the highlight of the album. I’ve only heard it live before and I’m surprised by how uncomfortably intimate it is in this original incarnation. And there’s a rare bonus track too. Nice.

Richard Thompson – Acoustic Classics (£10 Fopp Glasgow)

This is a set of newly-recorded acoustic versions of some of Richard’s most-loved songs. The familiarity of the track choices makes this a little underwhelming for devotees but it’s a still a masterfully performed set by a genuine genius. I expect this has been intended more as an introductory “Greatest Hits” and in that respect it works well. I’ve already heard this playing on the radio and in cafes so hopefully it will spread the word of RT to new listeners.

My Dying Bride – The Vaulted Shadows (£10 Fopp Glasgow)

My Dying Bride – A Map of All Our Failures (CD/DVD Edition) (£15 Amazon)

I’m working back a bit here, not having bought any of MDB’s releases since 2009’s For Lies I Sire. The Vaulted Shadows is a particularly welcome release as it compiles two EP releases, one of which is The Barghest O’ Whitby EP: released in 2011 but now prohibitively expensive to buy in a physical format. Buoyed by finally having it in my collection I decided to buy the special edition of their last full album A Map of All Our Failures before that went out-of-print too. Both releases are excellent and find the band at the top of their game. All cheery stuff like you might expect, the Metal equivalent of a decadent opium haze. Wilt thou bring me but one cup of the browned juicings of that naughty bean we call “coffee”, ere I die…

Candlemass – Psalms For the Dead (£4 Monorail Glasgow)

Pentagram – Last Rites (£4 Monorail Glasgow)

We end on couple of unexpected bargains courtesy of an equally unexpected sale at Glasgow’s Monorail. Doom overload! I’ve not listened to Pentagram yet but I’m delighted with the Candlemass album. It’s supposedly going to be their final studio album and they went out on a high, fleshing out their Epic Doom with some retro-horror keyboard sounds. The only downside is the stupid narration on Black as Time. Why they thought anyone would want to listen to that annoying voice more than once beats me. But otherwise it’s a strong effort and a fine follow-up to their previous winner Death Magic Doom.

*****

That’s us for this post but I’m not done with May-July’s buying yet. I’ll be back soon with a Black Metal special and, following that, I’ll be posting a vinyl special too. See you then.